Blackstone Parks Conservancy

On the Seekonk River

imageOn a sparkling Saturday in late September, a Save the Bay boat gave eager passengers rides up the Seekonk River for the second year running. Suzanne Paton of US Fish and Wildlife pointed out some of the river’s many fish and birds, including an osprey, a bald eagle, great blue herons, and a kingfisher. As if on cue, the fish were surfacing and gulls and cormorants were going after them.

Jointly sponsored by the Blackstone Parks conservancy, Save the Bay, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife, the event drew about 80 people, many of them children. It was a chance to see the river and bordering woodlands from a vantage point normally glimpsed only by rowers.

 

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Enjoy a boat ride up the Seekonk River and learn about the fish, birds and other wildlife that live in, on, and near the river. In addition, enjoy shoreside activities for families. This event is co-hosted by the Blackstone Parks Conservancy and Save the Bay. Seating is first come first serve so arrive early! Join us at the Narragansett Boat Club dock (2 River Road, near Angell Street, Providence, RI 02906).

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Learn Narragansett songs, dances and games from 10:30 to noon, and hear Narragansett stories and learn about the animals and plants in the woods. Take a guided walk in the park from 12:30 to 1:30, to see the woods as the Narragansett Indians see them and learn how they use the woods and water historically through today. With Narragansett cultural educator and artist Lorén Spears from the Tomaquag Museum.

At Blackstone Field across from the Narragansett Boat Club (2 River Road, Providence, RI 02906). Map coordinates: 41°49’58.8″N 71°22’40.9″W.

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Our Mushroom Trail Walk

Amanita muscaria Var. FormosaMushrooms were scarce, but people who wanted to learn about them were abundant on the August 16th Blackstone Parks Conservancy sponsored Mushroom Trail Walk. The traditional cap and stalk mushrooms’ preference for moist, dark places is well known. In a summer full of sun and little rain, they don’t produce fruit, which is the part we see and call a mushroom.

But the trail walk group was undeterred upon hearing that only two mushrooms had been seen in the entire center section of the conservation district the day before. Despite gloomy reports, we set off hoping to find some mushrooms ton which we could apply our new information on how to identify mushrooms. Due to the bright eyes and enthusiasm of the children, we were able to examine seven mushrooms in all. (By way of contrast, throughout the whole of August 2011, a bumper year for mushrooms, I photographed 44 different types of mushrooms in the same location as the one we walked this year.)

Thanks to all who attended for their interest and enthusiasm.

Elena Riverstone, BPC Volunteer